Brides do Good Encourage You to Say ‘I Do’ to a Sustainable Future

Social enterprise, Brides do Good are encouraging bridal designers and brands to foster a more eco-friendly approach to bridal fashion.

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Chantal Khoueiry, Brides do Good Founder
Chantal Khoueiry, Brides do Good Founder

When choosing a wedding dress there are numerous factors that all brides-to-be need to consider. Veil or no veil? Tulle or silk? Train or no train? However, for the socially conscious bride-to-be, the list of things to consider doesn’t stop there.

The impact of ‘fast fashion’ on the environment is continuing to escalate. Excess clothing production leads to surplus stock regularly being thrown away by clothing retailers, contributing to £140 million worth of clothing being sent to landfill each year – and the wedding industry is no exception to this.

In addition to this, an increasing number of brides-to-be are forking out thousands of pounds on designer dresses that will only be worn once before being left at the back of a wardrobe, and never seeing the light of day again. As a result, beautiful and expensive gowns are going to waste – and the traditional white wedding dress is fast becoming a symbol of excessive spending.

Brides do Good is a unique social enterprise bringing ethical style to the bridal market, by offering brides-to-be an opportunity to purchase a selection of the world’s most beautiful pre-loved, and sample designer wedding gowns - as well as new, never worn gowns from the current season – for a fraction of their RRP, with up to two thirds of funds raised from sales being invested in charity programmes that empower girls, educate communities and end child marriage.

Read More: Brides do Good Official Charity

Founded in 2016 by Chantal Khoueiry, Brides do Good partners with well-known bridal brands and designers - as well as real brides - to curate a high-end wedding gown collection. Brides-to-be can choose dresses from over 60 leading international wedding designers, including Vera Wang, Galia Lahav, Vivienne Westwood, Caroline Castigliano, and Pronovias - with gowns ranging from sizes 4-30, and all at affordable prices.

Not only does the Brides do Good model benefit previous brides who are looking for a sustainable way to donate their cherished wedding dress, but it also offers ethically-minded bridal designers and retailers a solution to combat the cycle of consumption by donating their sample gowns and excess stock.

How to Get Involved

When Brides do Good first started, many designers and retailers chose to utilize the platform as sellers, benefitting not only from another source of revenue but also a solution for older or non-saleable stock.

However, as time has gone on, Brides do Good believe the industry has begun to publicly embrace the notions of sustainability and ethical practice, and more and more brands are keen to talk about the good they are doing in a substantial, meaningful and measurable way.

As a result, Brides do Good has seen an increase in the number of brands keen to partner with them on a collaborative basis, donating high-quality stock with a real passion to see their social impact.

Ian Stuart, Peter Langner, Pronovias and Suzanne Neville all donate to Brides do Good and as Brand Partners, contributing to their range of beautiful, high-value gowns, and in some cases using their platforms to speak about their work together promoting women’s empowerment.

Read More: The Wedding Gallery Announce Their Partnership With Brides do Good

In addition to Partners who donate or sell stock, Brides do Good also have a range of Industry Partners who support the mission by providing services to the social enterprise either pro bono or at large discount, and who help elevate their message via their communities and networks.

Brides do Good welcome new discussions with potential partners, be it designer brands or others, to get involved check out their website here.

For more information about the charity find out how Chantal Khoueiry, Brides do Good Founder Spends her typical working day.

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